Entries in citizen science (4)

Thursday
Feb122015

Birding for Science - Spring/Summer Opportunities

nighttime surveys ©Scott Anderson
You don't have to be a scientist or researcher to participate in scientific studies! Even casual observations of the natural world can reveal species declines or previously unknown populations. In fact, many important, large scale studies would not be possible without data from the public! The NC Birding Trail has a new page of opportunities for novice to advanced birders and birdwatchers to collect data that will help scientists better understand bird populations.

Some upcoming projects:

1. Rusty Blackbird Blitz (Starting in March) - visit NCBT sites or other locations during the month of March and record any sightings of Rusty Blackbirds in eBird. - Some driving required; learn to identify 1 species; time commitment varies 

2. Nightjar Surveys (May - July) - Travel a pre-determined route at night, listening for chuck-will's-widow, eastern whip-poor-will, and common nighthawks. Don't be intimidated, there's plenty of resources to learn their calls! - Some driving required at night; learn to identify 3 species; ~6 hrs

3. NestWatch (Spring-Summer) - Find and record the success or failure of nests in your neighborhood, or nearby park. Nests could be in a nestbox or not! - No driving required; backyard species ID; ~2-3 hrs per year 

Stay tuned for other opportunities!

Thursday
Feb052015

The Great Backyard Bird Count This Weekend!

 

The easiest birding event to participate in happens this weekend, February 13-16. The Great Backyard Bird Count is an event sponsored by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. All you have to do to participate is watch for birds in your yard (or anywhere for that matter) for at least 15 minutes on one or more days this weekend then enter your data on their website or via the BirdLog AppCheck out their website for full details.

Not an expert? No problem! Bird-watchers of any experience level are encouraged to participate. The GBBC website provides resources for identifying birds, including some of the trickier, easy to mis-identify species. You could also use the Merlin Bird ID App.

If you don't have time this weekend, but are itching to watch bird for science, check out our list of annual citizen science efforts in the state.

 

Thursday
Mar132014

Birding for Science

nighttime surveys ©Scott Anderson
You don't have to be a scientist or researcher to participate in scientific studies! Even casual observations of the natural world can reveal species declines or previously unknown populations. The NC Birding Trail has a new page of opportunities for novice to advanced birders and birdwatchers to collect data that will help scientists better understand bird populations.

Some upcoming projects:

1. Rusty Blackbird Blitz (recent post) - visit NCBT sites or other locations during the month of March and record any sightings of Rusty Blackbirds in eBird.

2. Nightjar Surveys - Travel a pre-determined route at night, listening for chuck-will's-widow, eastern whip-poor-will, and common nighthawks. Don't be intimidated, there's plenty of resources to learn their calls!

3. NestWatch - Find and record the success or failure of nests in your neighborhood, or nearby park. Nests could be in a nestbox or not!

Stay tuned for other opportunities!

Thursday
Mar132014

Three Weekends Left for the Rusty Blackbird Blitz!

female rusty blackbird ©Lloyd Spitalnik

What is the Rusty Blackbird Blitz? It is a project designed to understand population dynamics of a cryptic species that winters in North Carolina. It is an effort by the Rusty Blackbird Working Group that relies on birders and birdwatchers like you! Many NC Birding Trail sites see Rusty Blackbirds, but we

need folks like you to build a larger dataset of observations for the month of March!

All you need to do to participate is to:

1. Learn how to identify Rusty Blackbirds with this handy identification guide

2. Find areas where they might congregate. Either check the detailed protocol., or check out which Birding Trail Sites can have Rusty Blackbirds and add to the map!!!

3. Visit those areas anytime during March, and record any observations (or no observations) on eBird, making sure to record your "Observation Type" as "Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz".

See this document for more detailed information. If you want more information about the project, check out the main Rusty Blackbird Blitz website.

If you are looking for more opportunities to "Birdwatch for Science", check out our new webpage of opportunities!